Skip to Main Content
University of Texas University of Texas Libraries

Black Voices & Antiracism Resources

A Collection of Anti-Racism Resources and Black Perspectives

Common Terms Defined

Common Terms Defined

Acronyms

BIPOC – Black, Indigenous, & People of Color

LGBTQIA – Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex, and Asexual

POC – People/Person of Color

WOC – Woman/Women of Color

 

General Terms

 

Anti-Blackness – “A two-part formation that both voids Blackness of value, while systematically marginalizing Black people and their issues. The first form of anti-Blackness is overt racism. Beneath this anti-Black racism is the covert structural and systemic racism which categorically predetermines the socioeconomic status of Blacks in this country. The structure is held in place by anti-Black policies, institutions, and ideologies.

The second form of anti-Blackness is the unethical disregard for anti-Black institutions and policies. This disregard is the product of class, race, and/or gender privilege certain individuals experience due to anti-Black institutions and policies. This form of anti-Blackness is protected by the first form of overt racism." - RacialEquityTools.org

Anti-racist practice – “To be antiracist is to think nothing is behaviorally wrong or right — inferior or superior — with any of the racial groups. Whenever the antiracist sees individuals behaving positively or negatively, the antiracist sees exactly that: individuals behaving positively or negatively, not representatives of whole races. To be antiracist is to deracialize behavior, to remove the tattooed stereotype from every racialized body. Behavior is something humans do, not races do.” – Ibram X. Kendi, How to be an antiracist 

Implicit Bias – “Also known as unconscious or hidden bias, implicit biases are negative associations that people unknowingly hold. They are expressed automatically, without conscious awareness. Many studies have indicated that implicit biases affect individuals’ attitudes and actions, thus creating real-world implications, even though individuals may not even be aware that those biases exist within themselves. Notably, implicit biases have been shown to trump individuals’ stated commitments to equality and fairness, thereby producing behavior that diverges from the explicit attitudes that many people profess.” – Cheryl Staats, State of the Science Implicit Bias Review 2013, Kirwan Institute, The Ohio State University

  • Implicit Bias Test-Harvard University "Project Implicit is a non-profit organization and international collaboration between researchers who are interested in implicit social cognition - thoughts and feelings outside of conscious awareness and control. The goal of the organization is to educate the public about hidden biases and to provide a “virtual laboratory” for collecting data on the Internet."

  • Snap Judgement Test from The Kirwan Institute collaboration with MTV to create a seven-day race and gender bias cleanse. It provides daily tasks that will help you de-bias yourself.

Institutional Racism – “Institutional racism refers specifically to the ways in which institutional policies and practices create different outcomes for different racial groups. The institutional policies may never mention any racial group, but their effect is to create advantages for whites and oppression and disadvantage for people from groups classified as people of color.” – Maggie Potapchuk, Sally Leiderman, Donna Bivens and Barbara Major, Flipping the Script: White Privilege and Community Building

Internalized Racism – “Internalized racism is the situation that occurs in a racist system when a racial group oppressed by racism supports the supremacy and dominance of the dominating group by maintaining or participating in the set of attitudes, behaviors, social structures and ideologies that undergird the dominating group’s power.” – Donna Bivens, Internalized Racism: A Definition

Privilege – “Unearned social power accorded by the formal and informal institutions of society to ALL members of a dominant group (e.g. white privilege, male privilege, etc.). Privilege is usually invisible to those who have it because we’re taught not to see it, but nevertheless it puts them at an advantage over those who do not have it.” – Colors of Resistance Archive

Racial Justice – “The proactive reinforcement of policies, practices, attitudes and actions that produce equitable power, access, opportunities, treatment, impacts and outcomes for all.” – Race Forward, Race Reporting Guide

Structural Racism – “The normalization and legitimization of an array of dynamics – historical, cultural, institutional and interpersonal – that routinely advantage Whites while producing cumulative and chronic adverse outcomes for people of color. Structural racism encompasses the entire system of White domination, diffused and infused in all aspects of society including its history, culture, politics, economics and entire social fabric. Structural racism is more difficult to locate in a particular institution because it involves the reinforcing effects of multiple institutions and cultural norms, past and present, continually reproducing old and producing new forms of racism. Structural racism is the most profound and pervasive form of racism – all other forms of racism emerge from structural racism.” – Keith Lawrence and Terry Keleher, Structural Racism for the Race and Public Policy Conference

White Fragility – “White fragility is a state in which even a minimum amount of racial stress becomes intolerable, triggering a range of defensive moves. These moves include the outward display of emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and behaviors such as tears, argumentation, silence, and leaving the stress-inducing situation. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium.White people in North America live in a social environment that protects and insulates them from race-based stress. This insulated environment of racial protection builds white expectations for racial comfort while at the same time lowering the ability to tolerate racial stress, leading to…White Fragility.” – Robin DiAngelo, White Fragility why it’s so hard for White people to talk about racism

White Privilege – “It’s the level of societal advantage that comes with being seen as the norm in America, automatically conferred irrespective of wealth, gender or other factors. It makes life smoother, but it’s something you would barely notice unless it were suddenly taken away — or unless it had never applied to you in the first place.” – Christine Emba, “What is White Privilege” in The Washington Post

White Supremacy – “White supremacy is an ideology, a paradigm, an institutional system, and a worldview that you have been born into by virtue of your white privilege…. [T]he historic and modern legislating, societal conditioning, and systemic institutionalizing of the construction of whiteness as inherently superior to people of other races.” – Layla F. Saad, Me and White Supremacy

White Supremacy Culture– "The dominant, unquestioned standards of behavior and ways of functioning embodied by the vast majority of institutions in the United States. These standards may be seen as mainstream, dominant cultural practices; they have evolved from the United States’ history of white supremacy. Because it is so normalized it can be hard to see, which only adds to its powerful hold. In many ways, it is indistinguishable from what we might call U.S. culture or norms – a focus on individuals over groups, for example, or an emphasis on the written word as a form of professional communication. But it operates in even more subtle ways, by actually defining what “normal” is – and likewise, what 'professional,' 'effective,' or even 'good' is...And it does this without ever having to explicitly say so..." - Gita Gulati-Partee and Maggie Potapchuk, Paying Attention to White Culture and Privilege: A Missing Link to Advancing Racial Equity

 

Thank you to the UT Libraries Diversity Action Committee's Glossary of Terms and Acronyms and NYIT Anti-Oppression LibGuide

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic License.