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Chemistry Guest Seminars

Organic Seminars 2019

Friday, Sept. 13, 3:30-4:30pm, WEL 2.122topczewski

Harnessing the Winstein Rearrangement: Dynamic Chemistry of Allylic Azides

Joseph Topczewski

Assistant Professor

University of Minnesota

Topczewski Lab

We aim to invent transformative synthetic methods to reduce chemical waste generation, while simultaneously redefining how chemists approach making medicines. Today, synthesizing certain medicines generates >1,000 kilograms of chemical waste for each kilogram of drug. An increasing global demand, combined with a decreasing supply of resources, necessitates more sustainable syntheses. Our lab discovers and optimizes innovative synthetic methods to address this 21st century challenge. Superior methods i) prevent unnecessary resource consumption, ii) minimize the generation of chemical waste, and iii) provide access to new chemical space. New chemical space contains molecular diversity with unknown potential. Our current research focuses on i) enhancing chiral amine synthesis, ii) discovering salt-free coupling reactions, and iii) improving access to bromodomain inhibitors. These focus areas address specific longstanding synthetic challenges. Furthermore, our methods provide unique access to untapped chemical space, which we are exploring through collaboration for medicinal chemistry applications.


Publications (Group Site)

Publications (Google Scholar Citations)

Author Metrics

h-index: 13  Total Articles: 34  Total Citations:  916 (Web of Science, Jul. 2019)

h-index: 15  Total Citations:  1145 (Google Scholar Citations, Jul. 2019)

 

Friday, August 30, 3:30-4:30pm, WEL 3.134murakami

Synthetic reactions driven by energy of photons

Masahiro Murakami

Professor

Kyoto University

Group Web Site

Organometallic chemistry is one of the fundamental research area with great potential; Innumerable combinations of elements and bonding modes are possible, and therefore, it still has a lot of room which has been still unexplored. In addition, development of organometalic chemistry enables to synthesize new compounds, which can lead to development of vairous fields including molecular catalysts, functional materials, polymer synthesis, and pharmaceuticals. Our research project is based on organic synthesis, but our goal is "innovative discovery" which would stimulate the related sciences.

1. Synthetic Transformations Exploiting Light as the Energy Source:  Photosynthesis produces carbohydrates starting from CO2 and H2O by exploiting solar light as the energy source. This intriguing synthetic system, if liberally interpreted, consists of two stages. One is "light reaction", a photo-induced reaction producing energetic compounds. Another is "dark reaction", a thermal reaction of the resulting energetic compounds. We are engaged in the development of new synthetic transformations of unreactive materials like CO2 based on this two-stage mechanism.
2. Synthetic Transformations Based on Cleavage of Unreactive Bonds:  Reactivities of organic molecules generally originate from their π-bonds like C=C and C=O, polar σ-bonds like C–Br and C–Li, and non-bonding electron pairs. Non-polar σ-bonds like C–H and C–C are far less reactive, and thus remain intact under conventional reaction conditions in most cases. Therefore, if such non-polar σ-bonds are site-selectively cleaved and are utilized for construction of carbon skeletons, it would create unconventional opportunities of enormous synthetic potential. We have tackled to this challenging issue and found that transition metals like nickel and rhodium promote C-C cleavage reactions of cyclobutanones. In recent years, we have tried to exploit light as the driving force to induce even energetically uphill transformations, which are intrinsically difficult only by thermal reactions.
3. Multiple Functionailzation of Terminal Alkynes in One-pot:  Terminal Alkynes are readily available. In addition, they possess reasonable reactivity as well as stability. Consequently, terminal alkynes serve as useful starting substances for organic synthesis. We are engaged in the development of multiple functionalization of terminal alkynes to produce complex molecules in a single flask. For example, we have developed synthetic methods for N-heterocyclic compounds through denitrogenative transformations of triazoles robustly generated by the (3+2) cycloaddition reaction of terminal alkynes with azides (Huisgen reaction).
Profile in Angewandte Chemie


Publications (Group Site)

Author Metrics

Not available due to name ambiguation

Friday, July 19, 1:00-2:00pm, WEL 2.122hargrove

From Patterns to Function in Small Molecule:RNA Interactions

Amanda E. Hargrove

Assistant Professor

Duke University

PhD UT Austin 2010

Group Web Site

The Hargrove lab harnesses the unique properties of small organic molecules to study the structure, function and therapeutic potential of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). The discovery of these fascinating biomolecules has caused a paradigm shift in molecular biology and speculation as to their role as the master drivers of diseases such as cancer. At the same time very little is known about their structure and function, leading some to call the field a veritable “Wild West.” Small molecules are the perfect tools for such exploration, and the Hargrove lab works at the interface of chemistry and biology, employing methods ranging from RNA-targeted small molecule synthesis and array-based pattern recognition to studies of the molecular and cellular biology of nucleic acids. Collaborations with the Department of Biology as well as colleagues in the School of Medicine ensure that these tools are applied to the most important unsolved problems in the fundamental biology and disease-related actions of long noncoding RNAs.


Publications (Group Site)

Publications (Google Scholar Citations)

ORCID:  https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1536-6753

Author Metrics

h-index: 13  Total Articles: 24  Total Citations:  804 (Web of Science, Jul. 2019)

h-index: 17  Total Citations:  1038 (Google Scholar Citations, Jul. 2019)

 

Monday, May 20, 3:30-4:30pm, WEL 2.122Kobayashi

Synthesis and Characterization of Spectroscopically Intriguing Phthalocyanines and Cyclic Pyrrole Compounds

Nagao Kobayashi

Professor

Shinshu University, Japan

All substances consist of one or several molecules, which can exhibit a versatile range of properties. Two key aspects of chemical research are the synthesis of novel functional molecules and the development of an in-depth understanding of their molecular functionalities. Based on this idea, our research interest focuses on the design and synthesis of new functional molecules based on phthalocyanines and porphyrins as well as the elucidation of the origin of their molecular functionalities based on spectroscopic analyses and theoretical calculations.


Publications (Google Scholar Citations)

Author Metrics

h-index: 73  Total Citations: 20,423  (Google Scholar Citations, May. 2019)

 

Monday, May 6, 3:30-4:30pm, WEL 2.122vanveller

Surfing the excited state energy surface towards new applications in photochemistry and biomedicine

Brett VanVeller

Assistant Professor

Iowa State University

VanVeller Lab

Chemists possess an unparalleled understanding of how the complexity of macroscopic matter emerges from the relative simplicity of atoms and molecules; we seek to employ these insights to investigate the widening interface between chemistry, material science and biology.  Our research program aims to develop tools to interrogate, understand and manipulate the interactions that occur between (bio)macromolecules. Synthetic chemistry and the development of new methods underpin all aspects of our research, and we apply the principles of chemistry towards the precise molecular-level design and engineering of these systems.


Publications (Group Site)
Publications (Google Scholar Citations)

Author Metrics

h-index: 11  Total Articles:  23  Total Citations: 359 (Web of Science, Apr. 2019)

h-index: 12  Total Citations: 492  (Google Scholar Citations, Apr. 2019)

 

Friday, May 3, 3:30-4:30pm, WEL 2.122liu

Predictive Models for Reactivity and Selectivity of Transition Metal Catalyzed Organic Reactions

Peng Liu

Assistant Professor

University of Pittsburgh

Liu Group

We are developing computational models to quantitatively describe the origins of reactivity and selectivity in organocatalytic and transition metal-catalyzed reactions. We perform quantum mechanical calculations to explore the reaction mechanism, followed by thorough analysis on various stereoelectronic effects to predict how changes of the catalyst structure, substituents, and solvent affect rate and selectivity. We use quantitative energy decomposition methods to dissect the key interactions in the transition state and provide chemically meaningful interpretation to the computed reactivity and selectivity.  We apply these computational studies to a broad range of organic and organometallic reactions, such as C–H and C–C bond activations, olefin hydrofunctionalization, olefin metathesis, and polymerization reactions. 


Publications (Group Site)
Publications (Google Scholar Citations)

Author Metrics

h-index: 44  Total Citations: 5067  (Google Scholar Citations, Apr. 2019)

[Web of Science metrics not available due to name ambiguation.]

Wednesday, May 1, 3:30-4:30pm, WEL 2.122odoherty

De Novo Asymmetric Synthesis: Stereochemical-SAR (S-SAR) study of carbohydrate and natural product motifs

George O'Doherty

Professor

Northeastern University

O'Doherty Group

The O’Doherty research group has been developing new methods for the de novo synthesis of natural and unnatural structures, with a particular focus on the synthesis of biologically active natural products and carbohydrate motifs.  Our overarching synthetic goal is to use asymmetric transition metal catalysis to create absolute stereochemistry and a combination of catalysis and substrate control for diastereocontrol.  This concept can be seen in several of our natural product syntheses as well as our expanding ability to synthesize carbohydrates.  For example our early efforts to control all the stereochemistry of monosaccharides led to using catalysis to control the stereochemistry of the glycosidic bond and ultimately complex oligosaccharides. A long-term theme to this research is the development of highly stereoselective transformation that can be used for not only synthesis but also to enable medicinal chemistry studies. In fact, we have already had great success along these lines


Publications (Google Scholar Citations)

Author Metrics

h-index: 37  Total Articles: 118 Total Citations:  3542  (Web of Science, Apr. 2019)

h-index: 46  Total Citations: 5402 (Google Scholar Citations, Apr. 2019)

Department Seminar

Tuesday, April 30, 1:30-2:30pm, NHB 1.720chiosis

Protein Networks in Disease – From Detection to Targeting

Gabriela Chiosis

Sloan Kettering Institute

Chiosis Lab

Gabriela Chiosis’ lab uses a unique chemical biology approach to understand, diagnose, and treat cellular processes associated with chronic molecular stress, with the ultimate goal of developing novel therapeutic options for use in the clinic.


Publications (Group Site)

Publications (Google Scholar Citations)

Author Metrics

h-index: 47  Total Articles: 132 Total Citations:  7634  (Web of Science, Apr. 2019)

h-index: 54  Total Citations: 11,158 (Google Scholar Citations, Apr. 2019)

Friday, April 19, 3:30-4:30pm, WEL 2.122engle

New Strategies for Selective Alkene Functionalization

Keary M. Engle

Assistant Professor

Scripps Research Institute

Engle Lab

Organic small molecules make up the vast majority of medicines, biological probes, agrochemicals, and materials building blocks. Thus, though they are ubiquitous in modern society, many classes of small molecules remain problematic to prepare using conventional methods. Contemporary synthetic routes routinely require multiple steps, generate large quantities of waste, or require substantial human energy to troubleshoot.  Research in the Engle group focuses on addressing these challenges by harnessing the power of catalysis. Our group’s goal is to advance the efficiency, effectiveness, and sustainability of chemical synthesis. The projects that we tackle are highly interdisciplinary, and as a consequence, students complement their core training in synthetic organic, physical organic, and organometallic chemistry with expertise in related disciplines in and outside of chemistry.


Publications (Group Site)

Publications (Google Scholar Citations)

orcid  ORCID:  https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2767-6556

Author Metrics

h-index: 29  Total Articles: 59 Total Citations:  9757  (Web of Science, Apr. 2019)

h-index: 30  Total Citations: 10,806 (Google Scholar Citations, Apr. 2019)

Wednesday, April 17, 3:30-4:30pm, WEL 2.122malcolmson

New Strategies for the Catalytic Enantioselective Synthesis of Chiral Amines and Other Challenging Scaffolds

Steven Malcolmson

Assistant Professor

Duke University

Malcolmson Lab

The discovery of catalysts is of great importance to the practice of modern synthetic chemistry, both to improve upon the existing catalog of chemical transformations and to generate new modes of reactivity.  Research in the Malcolmson lab focuses on the discovery of novel methods for the efficient and selective synthesis of small molecule scaffolds through the design and development of new catalysts.  In these transformations, we seek to realize new synthetic bond disconnections while also controlling some aspect of selectivity (e.g., enantio-, and/or site selectivity).  The catalysts and methods developed in the group are being applied to the synthesis of biologically active molecules to drive the development of new chemistry as well as help to address problems in human health.


Publications (Group Site)

orcid  ORCID:  https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3229-0949

Author Metrics

h-index: 14  Total Articles: 24 Total Citations:  906  (Web of Science, Mar. 2019)

Rowland Pettit Centennial Visiting Professorship

Friday, April 12, 3:30-5:00pm, WEL 2.122coates

In Pursuit of the Perfect Plastic

Geoffrey Coates

Professor

Cornell University

Coates Group

The research focus of the Coates Group is the development of new synthetic strategies for producing polymers of defined structure. The control of polymer composition, architecture, stereochemistry, and molecular weight allows the indirect control of polymer properties via polymer morphology. Our research projects are interdisciplinary, addressing problems at the interface of organic, inorganic, organometallic, and polymer chemistry.


Publications (Group Site)
Publications (Google Scholar Citations)

Author Metrics

h-index: 69  Total Articles: 200  Total Citations:  18,919  (Web of Science, Mar. 2019)

h-index: 80  Total Citations:  25,930  (Google Scholar Citations, Mar. 2019)

Department Seminar

Monday, April 8, 3:30-4:30pm, WEL 2.122godula

Chemical tools for tailoring glycan interactions at the cell-matrix interface

Kamil Godula

Assistant Professor

University of California San Diego

Godula Lab

Glycoscience:  When most people talk about sugars, they think of the molecules we consume and use for metabolism. While carbohydrates are obviously an important part of our diet, sugar molecules are actually used for a number of different functional roles in biology like cell signaling and protein folding. Sugars that serve functional roles in the cell are called glycans. As a glycoscience group, the Godula lab is interested in exploring the chemistry and biology of glycans in cells. 


Publications (Group Site)

Author Metrics

h-index: 15  Total Articles: 29 Total Citations:  2493  (Web of Science, Mar. 2019)

Distinguished Alumni Lecture

Friday, April 5, 3:30-4:30pm, WEL 2.122zbieg

Targeting Transcription Factors For the Treatment of Cancer and Inflammation

Jason Zbieg

Scientist, Discovery Chemistry

Genentech

PhD 2012 (Krische)

Profile

In my current role, I lead a chemistry team tasked with drugging a novel biological pathway. Currently, I have two ongoing collaborations with Princeton University and The University of Texas. These collaborations are solely focused on pushing the limits of synthetic chemistry and developing novel bond formations.


Publications (Google Scholar Citations)

Author Metrics

h-index: 10  Total Articles: 13 Total Citations:  596  (Web of Science, Mar. 2019)

h-index: 11  Total Citations:  771  (Google Scholar Citations, Mar. 2019)

Wednesday, April 3, 3:30-4:30pm, WEL 2.122Thordarson

Programming (and) supramolecular chemistry

Pall Thordarson

Associate Professor

University of New South Wales, Sydney

Thordarson Group

Biomimetic Chemistry:  The most complex and elegant examples of "nanotechnology" come from Nature. In our group we first look to Nature for inspiration when it comes to solving the problems we are currently dealing with in nanotechnology (e.g., biosensors or tissue engineering). This is the philosophy of bio-mimetic chemistry, which underpins most of the work in our group.

Overview:  At the core of nearly all of our work is the art of synthetic organic chemistry, however, we also apply techniques from across the whole spectrum of chemistry (physical, inorganic, organic, supramolecular and surface chemistry) as well as biochemistry, biophysics and biology.  Methods (synthesis and/or self-assembly) to direct the assembly of functional molecules are of particular interest to us as are methods to analyse nanostructures, e.g. by the use of scanning probe microscopy (AFM and STM) and other advanced characterisation tools.


Publications (Group Site)
Publications (Google Scholar Citations)

Author Metrics

h-index: 28  Total Articles: 107 Total Citations:  5094  (Web of Science, Mar. 2019)

h-index: 30  Total Citations:  6784  (Google Scholar Citations, Mar. 2019)

Department Seminar

Friday, March 29, 3:30-4:30pm, Avaya Auditorium, POB 2.302boyer

Photoinduced Electron/Energy Transfer – Reversible Addition Fragmentation Chain Transfer Polymerisation (PET-RAFT): An efficient Tool for Polymer Synthesis

Cyrille Boyer

Professor, Chemical Engineering

University of New South Wales

Boyer Lab

Our research is centred on the development of environmentally friendly techniques for the synthesis of functional polymeric materials.  A major focus is photoinduced electron/energy transfer-reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (PET-RAFT) polymerisation where we are continuing to develop novel photoredox catalysts.

We are also developing various polymerisation techniques for visible-light-cotrolled radical polymerisation, such as continous flow PET-RAFT polymerisation and high-throughput synthesis of polymers through photopolymerisation in open-air.  Furthermore, we are exploring photopolymerisation in dispersed media for the synthesis of polymeric nanoparticles through polymerisiation-induced self assembly (photo-PISA).  Another focus is adapting the aforementioned techniques to the fabrication of advanced polymeric materials for  new synthetic antimicrobial macromolecules.

2018 Polymer Chemistry Lectureship awarded to Cyrille Boyer


Publications (Group Site)
Publications (Google Scholar Citations)

Author Metrics

h-index: 61  Total Articles: 206 Total Citations:  10,695  (Web of Science, Mar. 2019)

h-index: 69  Total Citations:  13,998  (Google Scholar Citations, Mar. 2019)

Monday, March 25, 3:30-4:30pm, WEL 2.122nagib

C-H and C-O Functionalization via Radical Chaperones

David Nagib

Assistant Professor

Ohio State University

Group Web Site

The Nagib Laboratory seeks to bridge the gap between what is possible and practical in the realm of organic synthesis. Our goal is to expand the synthetic toolbox by designing fundamentally new activation strategies and catalysts. We aim to harness the untapped reactivity of cheap and abundant chemical feedstocks as well as enable the late-stage functionalization of complex natural products. We are currently inventing multi-faceted approaches for selective C-H and C-O activation, using combinations of radical (1e-) and closed shell (2e-) processes. By emphasizing the design of novel, dual-catalytic strategies (organometallic, organocatalytic, redox-neutral, etc.) and a careful elucidation of their unique mechanisms, we are developing useful methodologies to enable non-classical synthetic disconnections. Our chemistry has important applications in various interdisciplinary arenas, including the streamlined synthesis of improved medicines, materials, and biofuels.


Publications (Group Site)

Publications (Google Scholar)

orcid icon  ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2275-6381

Author Metrics

h-index: 7  Total Articles: 12 Total Citations:  1795  (Web of Science, Mar. 2019)

h-index: 7 Total Citations: 2096 (Google Scholar Citations, Mar. 2019)

Friday, March 1, 3:30-4:30pm, WEL 2.122newhouse

Synthesis of Neuroactive Terpenoids Using Chemical and Computational Strategies

Timothy Newhouse

Associate Professor

Yale University

Group Web Site

Despite the power of modern organic chemistry, efficient synthesis of complex molecular scaffolds remains an unmet challenge.  Their intricate ring systems and stereochemical arrays require too many synthetic operations to rapidly produce libraries of analogs.  New technological approaches are needed to forge their varied bonds to provide scalable access to libraries of these molecular architectures.  Through detailed mechanistic study, such technologies can be developed.

The development of general construction reactions will have broad utility in a range of fields that rely on the synthesis of small molecules and functional materials.  One particular area that the Newhouse group focuses on is the total chemical synthesis of carbocyclic frameworks that are known to elicit powerful neurological effects.  These substances will both serve as chemical probes to study fundamental aspects of neurological function and address neurological dysfunction.

We focus our efforts on the development of new synthetic methods to rapidly acquire these structurally complex small molecules. These substances will be exploited for a variety of purposes by collaborating with neuroscientists.


Publications (Group Site)

Author Metrics

h-index: 11  Total Articles: 23 Total Citations:  307  (Web of Science, Feb. 2019)

Faculty Recruiting Seminar

Thursday, February 28, 1:00-2:00pm, WEL 2.122ackerman

Dual Metal Strategies for Catalytic C-C Bond Formation

Laura Ackerman

Postdoctoral Fellow

Princeton University

Abby Doyle Group

PhD, Rochester, 2016 (Daniel Weix)

Doyle Group research focus:  Research in our lab takes place at the interface between the fields of organic synthesis, organometallic catalysis, and physical organic chemistry. We are involved in designing synthetic strategies that enable efficient and selective preparation of complex molecules and biologically privileged structural motifs. To achieve these goals, we harness the activity of inexpensive and abundant transition metal catalysts to achieve novel bond-forming processes. Projects in the group are designed to provide students with expertise in reaction discovery and development, while exposing them to problems in complex target synthesis and mechanistic analysis.


Publications (Doyle Group)

Author Metrics

h-index:  6  Total Articles:  7  Total Citations: 323 (Web of Science, Jan. 2019)

Faculty Recruiting Seminar

Tuesday, February 26, 1:00-2:00pm, NHB 1.720biegasiewicz

Chemical and Enzymatic Strategies for Selective Synthesis

Kyle Biegasiewicz

Postdoctoral Fellow

Princeton University

Todd Hyster Group

PhD, Rochester, 2016 (Robert Boeckman)

Members of the Hyster group are trained in synthetic chemistry, organometallic chemistry and chemical biology with a strong emphasis on chemical reaction development.


Publications (Hyster Group)

Author Metrics

h-index:  5  Total Articles:  9  Total Citations: 79 (Web of Science, Feb. 2019)

Departmental Colloquium

Wednesday, February 20, 3:30-4:30pm, WEL 2.122Yaghi

Reticular Chemistry

Omar Yaghi

James and Neeltje Tretter Chair
Professor of Chemistry

University of California Berkeley

Group Web Site

In the Yaghi group we are building chemical structures by stitching molecules together into large and extended frameworks within which we can store hydrogen, methane, and separate carbon dioxide. The interior of the crystals is capable of compacting gases under ambient conditions thus foregoing the use of high pressures and low temperatures. In this movie, crystals of metal-organic framework-5 (MOF-5, numbered in roughly chronological order of discovery) are made and their structure is precisely designed to have zinc oxide units linked by organic struts (terephthalate) to make a porous network into which voluminous gases can be compacted and transported. This large open space is currently being used for positioning of organic and organometallic catalysts, charge storage for supercapacitors and binding of biological molecules such as proteins and metabolites.

Omar Yaghi awarded 2018 Wolf Prize
Pioneering chemist Omar Yaghi wins the Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Basic Sciences
Albert Einstein World Award of Science 2017


Publications (Group Site)

Publications (Google Scholar Citations)

ORCIDhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-5611-3325

Author Metrics

h-index: 125   Total Articles: 253  Citations:  100,495 (Web of Science, Jan. 2019)

h-index: 140  Total Citations:  135,467 (Google Scholar Citations, Feb. 2019)

 

Friday, February 15, 3:30-4:30pm, WEL 2.122schanze

Water Soluble Conjugated Polymers: Properties and Applications in Sensing and Disinfection

Kirk Schanze

Professor and Robert A. Welch Distinguished University Chair in Chemistry

University of Texas San Antonio

Group Web Site

Research in the Schanze Labs is focused on the interaction of light with small molecules, polymers, and materials. We have an interest in photochemical and photophysical processes that are stimulated when molecular systems absorb light. Most of our current work centers on studies that explore the phenomenon of luminescence (light emission). In our fundamental work, we apply a variety of spectroscopic methods such as fluorescence spectroscopy and laser-induced time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to gain information concerning the mechanisms of the light absorption and light emission processes. In applied work, we are using the light emission process of molecules and materials to develop novel light emitting devices (polymer LEDs), and novel fluorescent sensors. Some of our sensor systems are being used by aerodynamics engineers in wind-tunnel and mechanics tests and by chemists and biochemists for sensing analytes of interest.


Publications (Group Site)

ORCIDhttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-3342-4080

Author Metrics

h-index: 65  Total Articles: 270  Total Citations:  13,088  (Web of Science, Jan. 2019)

 

Monday, February 11, 3:30-4:30pm, WEL 2.122snaddon

Enantioselective Chemical Synthesis Methods via Cooperative Catalysis: Design, Development and Application

Thomas Snaddon

Assistant Professor

Indiana University

Group Web Site

Enantioselective cooperative catalysis: In the arena of reaction development, we leverage the power of catalysis to engineer new reactivity.  Through a synergistic union of Lewis base and transition metal catalysis, we have developed a platform for the enantioselective α‐functionalization of acyclic esters. This protocol effectively addresses long standing issues with control over enolate geometry of acyclic nucleophiles while simultaneously decoupling enantiocontrol – engendered by the Lewis base catalyst – and reactivity, which can be tailored by tuning the ligand sphere around the metal centre.  Targeted Synthesis:  We are also interested in applying our cooperative catalysis methodology in the area of targeted synthesis in order to identify efficient routes for the synthesis of a variety of natural product and drug-like molecules of biological interest.


Publications (Group Site)

orcid icon   ORCIDhttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-1119-0332

Author Metrics

h-index: 9  Total Articles: 16 Total Citations:  268 (Web of Science, Jan. 2019)

 

HHMI Lecture

Friday, February 8, 3:30-5:00pm, WEL 2.122johnson

Investigation of C-C Bond Activation: Mechanistic Understanding Leading to New Methodologies

Jeffrey B. Johnson

Associate Professor

Hope College

Group Web Site

Transition metal catalysis continually revolutionizes the synthesis of complex natural products and potential drug candidates by revealing reaction pathways inaccessible via traditional organic transformations. One area of current interest is the development of methodology for the cleavage and functionalization of carbon-carbon bonds. While carbon-carbon single bonds are inert under a vast majority of standard reaction conditions, certain transition metal complexes promote the activation of these bonds.


Publications (Profile Page)

ORCID:  https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1548-7117

Author Metrics

h-index: 12  Total Articles: 18  Total Citations:  757 (Web of Science, Jan. 2019)

 

Faculty Recruiting Seminar

Monday, February 4, 3:30-4:30pm, WEL 2.122tang

From Peptide Antibiotics to CRISPR-Mediated Synthetic Memories: Tools from the Microbial Arsenal

Weixin Tang

Postdoctoral Fellow

Harvard University

David R. Liu Group

PhD, Illinois, 2015 (W.A. van der Donk)

Liu Group research focus:  DNA-Templated Synthesis & DNA-Encoded Libraries:  Bioactive synthetic small molecules and synthetic polymers using DNA-templated organic synthesis, a technique pioneered by the Liu group, and Darwinian selection.  Protein evolution and delivery:  The laboratory evolution and in vivo delivery of proteins with therapeutic or biotechnological potential.  Genome editing:  The development and application of genome-editing proteins to study biology and to treat genetic diseases.


Publications (Google Scholar Citations)

Author Metrics

h-index:  12  Total Citations: 686 (Google Scholar Citations, Jan. 2019)

Monday, January 28, 3:30-4:30pm, WEL 2.122hargrove

Deciphering patterns in selective small molecule:RNA interactions

Amanda E. Hargrove

Assistant Professor

Duke University

Group Web Site

The Hargrove lab harnesses the unique properties of small organic molecules to study the structure, function and therapeutic potential of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). The discovery of these fascinating biomolecules has caused a paradigm shift in molecular biology and speculation as to their role as the master drivers of diseases such as cancer. At the same time very little is known about their structure and function, leading some to call the field a veritable “Wild West.” Small molecules are the perfect tools for such exploration, and the Hargrove lab works at the interface of chemistry and biology, employing methods ranging from RNA-targeted small molecule synthesis and array-based pattern recognition to studies of the molecular and cellular biology of nucleic acids. Collaborations with the Department of Biology as well as colleagues in the School of Medicine ensure that these tools are applied to the most important unsolved problems in the fundamental biology and disease-related actions of long noncoding RNAs.


Publications (Group Site)

ORCID:  https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1536-6753

Author Metrics

h-index: 12  Total Articles: 21  Total Citations:  703 (Web of Science, Jan. 2019)

 

Faculty Recruiting Seminar

Monday, January 14, 3:30-4:30pm, Avaya Auditorium, POB 2.302zhang

Novel Strategies in the Field of Synthetic Chemistry to Forge Carbon-Carbon Bonds and Identify New Bioconjugation Reagents

Patricia Zhang

Postdoctoral Researcher

University of California Berkeley

Dean Toste Group

Research in the Toste group is primarily aimed toward the development of catalysts, catalytic reactions and methods for organic synthesis. Ultimately, we are interested in using these methods to address problems in the synthesis of complex molecules possessing interesting structural, biological and physical properties. As such, our research program spans the areas of organic synthesis, catalysis, and organometallic chemistry.


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