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University of Texas University of Texas Libraries

Chemistry

ChemDraw

Getting the Software

CD logoChemDraw Professional is chemical drawing software licensed for campus users jointly by the departments of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, and Molecular Biosciences.  (The University Libraries do not fund or support this software, and it is no longer available on library workstations.)

Individuals can install the software on one or more personal devices.  Start the download process here: 

Here's the procedure:

  1. You'll need a personal email account ending in utexas.edu to register at the PerkinElmer download site. 
  2. If you've already registered, log in with your SciStore/Cambridgesoft credentials. 
  3. You'll be taken to the PE fulfillment page, where you can choose the platform you want:  Windows, Mac, or the cloud.
  4. Download and install the software.
  5. You will receive a registration email from PerkinElmer containing the current registration numbers to enter when you launch the app.

 

Versions 17+

We have upgraded our site license for ChemOffice, but the later versions must be downloaded from a separate enterprise site:

Expired Registration?

  • The annual campus license expires every October 1.  After that the old registration code no longer works and you'll need a new one.
  • To get a new code, repeat the download process as above, and this will trigger the email with the new codes.  You don't need to reinstall the software as long as you already have the same version. 
  • Launch the app and enter the new codes in the pop-up window. 

Troubleshooting and Support

As always, start with the Help feature in the software itself.  Nobody on campus actually "supports" this software in the sense of helping you use it and troubleshooting when it doesn't work right.  Your best bet is to ask someone in your lab who has experience using it.  You can submit a ticket to the CNS IT help desk for some underlying computer issues, but they don't use the software.  There are also some videos on YouTube that might get you started.  And posting your tough questions to Reddit r/chemistry can sometimes yield fast, helpful advice from the crowd. 

Alternatives

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